Main

All languages provide some way to execute code immediately.

Scripting languages such as Python and Ruby will execute all code in order immediately, whereas class-based languages such as C# and Java require a class wrapping a static method akin to C/C++'s "main" function.

GLS resolves the differences by declaring an area as a "main context" with main context start and main context end. A main function may be declared within that context with main start and main end.

main context start
    main start
        print : ("Hello world!")
    main end
main context end

In C#:

using System;

class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello world!");
    }
}

In Python:

if __name__ == "__main__":
    print("Hello world!")

Functions

Main contexts, other than the way they're declared, are functionally identically to standalone function groups. That means you can still declare standalone functions within them.

main context start
    standalone function declare start : private SayHello void name string
        print : { concatenate : ("Hello, ") name "!" }
    standalone function declare end

    main start
        standalone function : private { main group } SayHello "GLS"
    main end
main context end

In C#:

using System;

class Program
{
    private void SayHello(string name)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello, " + name + "!");
    }

    public static void Main()
    {
        SayHello("GLS");
    }
}

In Python:

def say_hello(name):
    print("Hello, " + name + "!")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    say_hello("GLS")

Function names must be given in PascalCase so that GLS can transform them into the appropriate case for the output language. JavaScript, for example, prefers camelCase, while Python prefers snake_case.

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